International Law

 

The International Law curriculum offers LL.M. candidates a unique opportunity for graduate study in a place with significant historical, political, cultural, geographical and educational connections to international law and international legal institutions.

The state of New York has long been recognized as an international center in everything from finance and business to art. Albany Law School, as the only law school in the capital of New York, plays a central role in the modern contribution of the state to the development of international law and international cooperation.

The International Law program curriculum at Albany Law School is broad and deep. Eight full-time faculty members form the International Law faculty, an impressive number for a mid-size law school, and one of the School's endowed chairs is in international commercial law. Beyond teaching and scholarship, International Law faculty members are active participants in and consultants to a wide range of international legal programs.

We offer many programs designed to foster not only the study of international law but also international exchange and cooperation. We operate a Summer Program in International Commercial Lawyering at McGill University in Montreal with Tulane Law School. We are engaged in an educational exchange with universities in Russia and are in the process of establishing similar exchanges with universities in France, Italy, Kenya, and Turkey. Our International Human Rights Internships Program has supported student internships in Britain, Canada, China, India and Morocco, among other countries.

A total of 24 credits must be earned, with up to eight credits of optional independent research. International Law is required, although waived if the candidate took the course as part of his/her J.D. program.

Courses

  • Title
  • Type
  • Credits
  • ​Surveys the main differences between U.S. and European patent law, with special attention to pharmaceuticals, biotechnology and computer-related inventions.

    Prerequisite: Patent and Trade Secrets or Introduction to Intellectual Property

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Studies problems in cases having contact with two or more states or nations. Course has three basic components: jurisdiction, choice of law, and recognition and enforcement of sister-state and foreign judgments.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2
    ​Provides an introduction to immigration and naturalization policies in the United States. Considers constitutional, statutory, and regulatory authorities confronting individuals and society. Students learn to navigate the complex regulatory framework to resolve basic immigration problems.
  • ​Examines topics related to conduct of international business: international private trade, U.S. and international regulation of trade, international private investment, international financial markets, international regulation of monetary affairs, and dispute resolution.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​nternational child rights will focus on interpretation and implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). The CRC, adopted by the General Assembly in 1989, is the most-ratified treaty in the world. The CRC addresses a wide variety of themes including discrimination, armed conflicts, prison, family life and education, to list just a few examples. This course will approach the CRC as it is understood by lawyers, by activists, and by academics from all around the world. participants will learn how to research and write in the area of international human rights, with a focus on child rights.

    Prior knowledge of International Law and Human Rights is not required. International Child Rights is open to all. Grading will be evaluated on the basis of papers and class participation. There will be no final examination.​

  • ​Provides an introduction and overview designed to familiarize students with basic principles. It also will take up several specific, substantive subject areas of current interest, such as acid rain, international handling of hazardous waste and conservation of bio diversity and protection of natural resources. In addition, the course will cover several of the institutions established to address global or regional environmental problems, as well as the role of non-governmental organizations in resolving them.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Deals with legal issues arising from international financial transactions and requirements and the international payment system with its clearance and settlement. Introduces basic financial and economic concepts important to the infrastructure of international finance.

  • ​This seminar examines the origin, scope, and protection of international human rights both internationally and in domestic litigation. Students write a research paper on a topic of their choice. The paper is eligible to satisfy the upper year writing requirement, and the course satisfies the international law requirement.

  • ​An understanding of the fundamental principles and doctrines of international law that govern the use of force and the responsibility for war crimes and crimes against humanity. Among the topics covered are the limitations on the use of force and the resort to force, both nation-state and collective action, the treatment of combatants and civilians, and the recognition and prosecution of international criminal law including war crimes and crimes against humanity, as well as international cooperation, institutions and criminal liability.​

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Introduces the Japanese legal system. Studies Japanese law as a social institution, an instrument of state intervention, and an issue in U.S.-Japanese trade relations. Focuses on market access, unfair trade practices, structural impediments, and industrial policy.

  • ​Examines litigational problems unique to suing foreign defendants in federal and state courts in the United States. Topics examined are amenability to suit, service of process, subject matter jurisdiction, forum non convenes, taking evidence abroad, and enforcement of judgments. Focuses primarily on individual and corporate defendants, and explores special problems associated with suing foreign sovereigns.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    Provides an in-depth overview of the legal issues affecting refugees and asylum seekers in the U.S. Examines case law, treaties and protocols, and current trends in the U.S. and the international community. Also examines the preparation and defense of asylum/refugee claims at the affirmative level and in immigration and federal courts. Special emphasis is given to issues in gender related persecution claims.

    Prerequisite: Immigration Law ​

Also see the full course catalog.

Faculty