International Law

 

Requirements

24 credits including Public International Law (3 credits), which is required:

  • Title
  • Type
  • Credits
  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Introduces students to major components of public international law. Topics include the nature, sources, and modes of application of international law; jurisdiction of nation-states over persons and territory; sovereign immunity; recognition and state succession; international claims and agreements; and authorized and unauthorized use of force. ​

At least 12 credits from the following courses:

  • Elective
    Credits: 2
    ​Provides an introduction to immigration and naturalization policies in the United States. Considers constitutional, statutory, and regulatory authorities confronting individuals and society. Students learn to navigate the complex regulatory framework to resolve basic immigration problems.
  • ​Studies the treaty regimes and jurisprudence that protect trademark, copyright, and patent internationally. Related foreign policy, public policy, and human rights considerations are treated on a selected basis.

  • ​Examines topics related to conduct of international business: international private trade, U.S. and international regulation of trade, international private investment, international financial markets, international regulation of monetary affairs, and dispute resolution.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​nternational child rights will focus on interpretation and implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). The CRC, adopted by the General Assembly in 1989, is the most-ratified treaty in the world. The CRC addresses a wide variety of themes including discrimination, armed conflicts, prison, family life and education, to list just a few examples. This course will approach the CRC as it is understood by lawyers, by activists, and by academics from all around the world. participants will learn how to research and write in the area of international human rights, with a focus on child rights.

    Prior knowledge of International Law and Human Rights is not required. International Child Rights is open to all. Grading will be evaluated on the basis of papers and class participation. There will be no final examination.​

  • ​This seminar examines the origin, scope, and protection of international human rights both internationally and in domestic litigation. Students write a research paper on a topic of their choice. The paper is eligible to satisfy the upper year writing requirement, and the course satisfies the international law requirement.

  • ​An understanding of the fundamental principles and doctrines of international law that govern the use of force and the responsibility for war crimes and crimes against humanity. Among the topics covered are the limitations on the use of force and the resort to force, both nation-state and collective action, the treatment of combatants and civilians, and the recognition and prosecution of international criminal law including war crimes and crimes against humanity, as well as international cooperation, institutions and criminal liability.​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​This course will address modern forms of international law-making and regulations, as well as enforcement and dispute settlement, emphasizing especially the impact of institutions. It will examine how intergovernmental or international organizations, from those of the UN system to the World Trade Organization (WTO), have changed the traditional sources of international obligation, namely treaties, customary international law, and general principles.

  • A nation's participation in world trade is often viewed as key to its economic growth and development. This seminar provides an introduction to international trade law with a primary focus on the World Trade Organization (WTO) and its regulation of trade in goods, services, intellectual property, and foreign direct investment.  Students analyze problems of law and policy of their choice in a research paper.  Students are invited but not required to focus the research paper on a problem relevant to developing countries, which comprise two-thirds of the membership of the WTO. 

    No background in international law or economics is required. The paper may be used to satisfy the upper year writing requirement, and the class satisfies the international law requirement.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​This course is a general introduction to the body of domestic and international law developing daily to grapple with catastrophic anthropogenic climate change. The course begins with a general overview of current climate science, and the policy, economics, and legal framework of the law of climate change. The next module covers an introduction to international environmental law, including the climate treaties and current negotiations. We will explore the growing theories of international human rights to a clean environment and stable climate, and the attempts to locate and enforce these rights in international and U.S. law. Turning to domestic law we will examine the sources of law that govern the principal sources of greenhouse gases, both federal judicial and administrative law. Our exploration begins with the Clean Air Act, public nuisance theory, and other litigation concerning transportation and energy generation, two of the greatest contributors to greenhouse gas emissions. We will examine pending federal legislation. The course will then turn to regional, state and local initiatives to mitigation of and adaptation to the effects of climate change. The course will be conducted two-thirds in the classroom and one-third online. We will conduct several exercises and a simulated litigation of a climate change-related case.

No more than 9 of the 24 credits from the following courses:

  • Elective
    Credits: 4

    ​Discusses formation and organization of basic business organizations. Examines structure, finance, management, and control of business enterprises; rights and liabilities of owners, fiduciaries, and third parties; shareholder informational rights, shareholder suits and issuance of shares; and introduces problems of close corporations and state statutory and administrative regulations.

  • Uses a client-centered approach to develop skills in using active listening, dealing with difficult clients, building questioning techniques, developing theories, identifying alternatives and consequences, and engendering client decision-making.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Studies problems in cases having contact with two or more states or nations. Course has three basic components: jurisdiction, choice of law, and recognition and enforcement of sister-state and foreign judgments.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    Explores in depth the legal issues and discrete phenomena of domestic violence. Topics generally include intimate partner violence, criminal prosecution of batterers, child abuse and neglect, gay and lesbian battering, elder abuse, and the basis for intervention of the state. ​

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Uses simulations to expose students to the skills necessary to prepare for and draft transactional documents designed to express a legal right, privilege, function, duty, status, or disposition.

  • ​The Family Violence Litigation Clinic offers students challenging and rewarding opportunities to argue cases in court on behalf of persons who have been victimized by violence by intimate partners or family members.  Students will learn about domestic violence dynamics and the substantive law and procedure of Family Court.  Students will be admitted to the limited practice of law under the Student Practice Order of the Appellate Division, Third Judicial Department.  Under direct faculty supervision, students will interview and counsel clients; conduct fact investigation and discovery; draft pleadings, correspondence, motions, stipulations and orders; perform legal research and analysis; regularly appear with clients in court; negotiate cases with opposing counsel as well as the lawyer for the children involved; and conduct full evidentiary trials.  Students may also have the opportunity to write or argue an appellate case, conduct administrative hearings, and engage in community outreach. 

    Pre/Co-Requisite: Domestic Violence Seminar (Must register separately)​

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Provides 25 hours of training equivalent to the New York State Unified Court System training program for community mediators. Prepares students to serve as court-affiliated mediators and to counsel clients more effectively regardless of their area of law.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Introduces negotiation skills, offering hands-on experience preparing for and negotiating legal issues.

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Researc​​h paper:

Written under faculty supervision on a relevant aspect​ of international law. Must qualify for the Law School's upperclass writing requirement, and may or may not be used to satisfy that requirement.

(Effective November 6, 2012)