Governmental Administration & Regulation

 

Requirements

24 credits including Administr​ative Law (3 credits), which is required:

  • Title
  • Type
  • Credits
  • --
    Credits: 3

    Examines fundamental and practical issues of federal and New York administrative law. Deals with the scope of power of administrative agencies and the relationship of such agencies to other branches of government. ​​​

The remaining 21 credits can come​ from the following courses:

  • Examines application of the antitrust law to healthcare activities, including restrictions on healthcare advertising, enforcement of trade association ethical rules, peer review by hospitals, provider-payer relationships, physician joint ventures, and hospital mergers. ​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Examines legal and economic concepts of monopoly and monopolization, and integration of previously independent firms through horizontal, vertical, and conglomerate mergers under federal antitrust laws. ​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Covers principles and operation of the Sherman Act, Clayton Act and Federal Trade Commission Act and their effect upon conduct, as opposed to structure, of American industry. Examines issues of price fixing, boycotts, exclusive dealing, territorial allocation, tie-ins, franchise terminations, and governmental immunity for anti-competitive regulations.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    The course will explore the issues concerning protection of intellectual creativity under the United States copyright laws; we will consider such matters as the nature of copyright, the statutory scheme, the kinds of works subject to copyright, and the extent of protection afforded those works. The grade will be based on performance on an end of semester examination.

  • ​Designed to introduce students to the legal aspects of current public policy challenges facing New York State. Through reading and analyzing various federal and state constitutional, statutory and regulatory provisions, students will be challenged to critique legal reasoning that is offered in support of various state government policy initiatives. Class discussions will be enhanced through the participation of invited lecturers from the public, private and non-profit sectors representing the stakeholders in whatever reform or action is being sought.

    Not eligible for upperclass writing requirement.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Uses simulations to expose students to the skills necessary to prepare for and draft transactional documents designed to express a legal right, privilege, function, duty, status, or disposition.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to familiarize students with the matrix of legal protections available to employees and employers from the hiring process to the termination of the employment relationship. It encourages students to examine common law and statutory rights of the parties while considering policy implications of the employment law system. The substantive areas to be covered include hiring/firing, wages, hours, and benefits, conditions of employment, employment security, and occupational health and safety. Unlike labor law which can be roughly organized around one federal statute (National Labor Relations Act), employment law is found in hundreds of separate cases and statutes.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Focuses on developing general analytical framework for understanding environmental law, including development of common law, with emphasis on statutory and regulatory techniques for pollution control.

  • Focuses on timely environmental issues. Students develop strategies to address the issues selected.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Explores the foundational principles and doctrines governing the legal and political relationship between the United States, the states, and Indian tribes.  Examines the history of federal Indian law and policy, tribal property rights, congressional plenary power, the trust doctrine, tribal sovereignty, and jurisdiction in Indian Country.  Focuses on current issues in Indian Law, including gaming, reservation economic development, fishing and hunting rights, cultural resource protection, and tribal rights in natural resources.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Covers ethical issues faced by members of the legislative, executive, and judicial brances of government at the federal, state and local levels. Covers special ethical responsibilities of attorneys in government service and the ethical obligations of government employees who are not attorneys.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2
    ​Provides an introduction to immigration and naturalization policies in the United States. Considers constitutional, statutory, and regulatory authorities confronting individuals and society. Students learn to navigate the complex regulatory framework to resolve basic immigration problems.
  • ​Introduces fundamental components of intellectual property law, focusing on patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Examines the judicial role. Focuses on creation and development of case law, theoretical and practical restraints on judges, and competing ideas regarding the nature of the judicial role in a constitutional democracy.

  • ​This seminar considers the relationship between law, justice, and morality.  Questions considered include: what is law? What are legal rules? What are rights?  What is the relation of law to justice in the modern regulatory state? Readings include historical material (e.g., ancient Greek and Roman writers) through to contemporary legal theory (e.g., law and economics, feminist legal theory, critical race theory, and postmodernism).  Students apply these perspectives to particular problems of law and policy in a research paper.  The paper may be used to satisfy the upper year writing requirement.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Analyzes use of arbitration to resolve both private and public sector labor disputes. Covers contract interpretation, disciplinary arbitration, and strategies and techniques in presenting an arbitration case.

    Prerequisite: Labor Law or Labor Law in the Public Sector

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Covers the developing body of law governing relationships among employers, employees, and unions. Considers the impact of collective bargaining on rights of individual employees, management's prerogatives, and public welfare.

  • Explores statutory and constitutional framework of collective bargaining in the public sector. Emphasizes a comparative approach to problems of strikes, organizational activity, bargaining frameworks, impasse resolution, and administration of collective bargaining agreements.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Examines legal techniques for public regulation of the use of land. Casebook has a national focus, but additional focus is placed on the New York planning and zoning enabling statutes, which were extensively revised in the 1990s.

  • Introduces the creation, interpretation and implementation of statutory law. Topics will include legislative process (both federal and New York State), judicial interpretation of statutes, and agency implementation of statutes. Emphasizes the application of legislative and interpretive theory to legal practice.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Introduces students to natural resources law and policy. The natural resources covered in the course include: Wildlife (endangered species and fisheries); Water (groundwater, surface water, and wetlands); Public Lands (forests, mining, rangeland, national parks, and wilderness areas); and Energy (oil & gas, coal, nuclear, hydropower, and alternative sources). The course focuses on issues from a national perspective, but includes specific discussion of a number of regional issues as well (e.g., the Adirondacks, New York City's water supply, and the Hudson Valley watershed). ​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Examines the major bodies of United States law available for protecting intellectual property rights in inventions and discoveries. The majority of the course is devoted to studying patent law, including the patenting process, patent validity requirements, patent infringement, and the nature of rights secured by a patent. The course also covers trade secret law, including trade secret-eligible information, trade secret requirements, and the rights secured by a trade secret. The course concludes with an examination of the relationship between, and the relative advantages and disadvantages of, patent and trade secret law for protecting intellectual property rights.

  • ​Involves a review of the law in the United States and abroad, with a concentration on New York law, including judicial interpretation, that is designed to promote open access to government as the public's right to know while guarenteeing safety and security for citizens.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Studies registration and prospectus requirements and exemptions for public and private offerings and sales of securities; regulation of securities transactions; regulation of corporate transactions such as mergers, acquisitions, takeovers, and tender offers; regulation of securities broker-dealers, exchanges and associations; and civil liabilities under the federal securities statutes.

    Prerequisite: Business Organizations ​

  • ​This course will examine environmental regulation and enforcement by state and local governments relating to stormwater and erosion control, forest and groundwater resources, essential public facilities siting, habitat protection and open space provision, among others.  The course will consider sources, scope and limitations in the authority of local governments to pursue an environmentally protective regime, the potential constitutional liabilities of government in regulating the use of the natural environment, and the conservation potential of the traditional tools that local governments wield (including planning and zoning, exactions, eminent domain, building codes).  This course will also look to emerging trends in local environmental law, including green buildings, sustainable development ordinances, environmental planning and climate change strategies.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Introduces structure, powers, and functioning of local governments and their interaction with the state. Topics include constitutional nature of local governments, incorporation, annexation, home rule, special districts and authorities, real property assessment and taxation, public access to information and meetings, state and local finance, and land use controls.  

  • This course examines the legal foundation for states and local governments to incur debt (municipal securities) and finance infrastructure. It reviews the federal law regulating the sale of municipal securities and disclosure requirements for investors, and federal law which permits interest on municipal securities to be tax-exempt. These fundamentals are examined through various financing structures employed by Wall Street investment bankers, together with case law and think-tank policy which guide the development of the modern municipal securities marketplace.​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Examines state and local tax issues with emphasis on New York tax issues.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3
    ​Analyzes nature and functioning of state constitutions in general and New York's in particular. Complete scope of subjects is discussed, in addition to comparison among various state constitutions.
  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    The course deals with the creation, enforcement, and limitation of trademark rights, including the impact of technological change (such as the use of the internet) on traditional concepts, and related unfair competition issues. The grade will be based on performance on an end of semester examination. ​

Completion of at least one of the fol​​lowing clinics or field placements:

  • ​The Civil Rights and Disabilities Law Clinic provides law students with a rewarding opportunity to serve clients and develop professional skills.  Under faculty supervision, students represent clients in various administrative forums and state and federal courts.  Many clients are individuals with disabilities who are struggling against systemic barriers that interfere with their civil rights and independence.  Clinic students assist their clients in removing those barriers.  Through simulated exercises and the representation of clients, student interns will develop the skills necessary to be effective attorneys: persuasion, drafting, alternative dispute resolution, negotiation, interviewing, counseling, fact investigation, and trial practice.  Students will also have the opportunity to successfully navigate complicated bureaucracies and negotiate with local, state, and federal officials.  ​​​​

  • This offering is designed as a course in the basic lawyering skills, with the litigation process as its focus.  

    The course has three components: a practice component, a simulation component, and a classroom component.  

    In the practice component, students represent clients in hearings and appeals involving unemployment benefits.  All cases are referred by the Legal Aid Society of Northeastern New York.  Students assigned to represent each client complete the following legal tasks under the supervision of the Clinical Professor: client interviewing; fact investigation; legal research; case planning; preparation of pleadings and all other court papers; and witness preparation and client representation in administrative proceedings and state court.  

    In the simulation component, each student participates in a semester-long simulation representing a client and performing the basic legal tasks required in the practice component.  

    In the classroom component, the legal tasks performed in the simulation and practice components are the subject of lecture and discussion.  

    This progressively challenging approach involves classroom lecture and discussion, simulation, and actual casework, offering law students an ideal introduction to the performance of lawyering tasks. 

    Students are admitted to the limited practice of law under the Student Practice Rule.

    Pre/Co-Requisite: None

    ​​​

Researc​​h paper:

Written under faculty supervision on a relevant aspect of governmental law. Must qualify for the Law School's upperclass writing requirement, and may or may not be used to satisfy that requirement..

(Effective November 6, 2012)

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