Equine, Racing and Gaming Law

 

Requirements

24 credits, with at least 1​​6 credits from the following courses:

  • Title
  • Type
  • Credits
  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Examines fundamental and practical issues of federal and New York administrative law. Deals with the scope of power of administrative agencies and the relationship of such agencies to other branches of government. ​​​

  • Elective
    Credits: 4

    ​Discusses formation and organization of basic business organizations. Examines structure, finance, management, and control of business enterprises; rights and liabilities of owners, fiduciaries, and third parties; shareholder informational rights, shareholder suits and issuance of shares; and introduces problems of close corporations and state statutory and administrative regulations.

No more than 8 of the 24 credits fr​​om the following courses:

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Introduces the field and discipline of financial accounting. This course seeks to acquaint the non-financial student with the general purposes of accounting and the role of independent accountants in business and society. Intended for lawyers who have a non-financial background, the student will be introduced to the mechanics and terminology of financial accounting and will learn the basic principles and procedures of accountancy in the preparation of financial statements. With this foundation, the student will learn the purpose behind each of the individual financial statements and how to analyze and interpret the financial statements.​​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Covers principles and operation of the Sherman Act, Clayton Act and Federal Trade Commission Act and their effect upon conduct, as opposed to structure, of American industry. Examines issues of price fixing, boycotts, exclusive dealing, territorial allocation, tie-ins, franchise terminations, and governmental immunity for anti-competitive regulations.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    This course will introduce students to the legal principles, mechanics, and strategy of appellate advocacy, focusing largely on criminal cases. Students will learn about jurisdiction, finality, preservation of error, harmless error, standards of appellate review, the ethical responsibilities of appellate counsel, issue identification, drafting a statement of facts, constructing a legal argument, and oral argument. Using the record of an actual criminal trial, each student will brief and orally argue the appeal, for either the defendant or the prosecution.​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3
    This course surveys various areas of law that are important to businesses and their advisors, including: choosing the correct form of business entity, including tax and governance issues;licenses and permits; raising capital through equity and loans; business insurance; employment law; employee benefits; development and protection of intellectual property;and securities law issues. Paper course.
    Auditing allowed; Paper can be used for writing requirement.faculty approval.
  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Refers to a collection of statutory and common law recognized causes of action that arise out of business competition. Surveys these causes of action and analyzes them in the context of providing a source of protection to a business which is subject to potential economic harm from competitors, employees, suppliers, and others. Coverage will include false advertising, business defamation and disparagement, interference with contractual and prospective business relationships, misappropriation of trade values such as ideas, trade secrets, publicity rights, and mispresentation. Prohibitions against unfair and deceptive practices under the Federal Trade Commission Act will also be covered. Trademark issues fall outside the coverage of this course. Not open to students who have taken Unfair Trade Practices.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Studies problems in cases having contact with two or more states or nations. Course has three basic components: jurisdiction, choice of law, and recognition and enforcement of sister-state and foreign judgments.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Explores the foundational principles and doctrines governing the legal and political relationship between the United States, the states, and Indian tribes.  Examines the history of federal Indian law and policy, tribal property rights, congressional plenary power, the trust doctrine, tribal sovereignty, and jurisdiction in Indian Country.  Focuses on current issues in Indian Law, including gaming, reservation economic development, fishing and hunting rights, cultural resource protection, and tribal rights in natural resources.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2
    ​Provides an introduction to immigration and naturalization policies in the United States. Considers constitutional, statutory, and regulatory authorities confronting individuals and society. Students learn to navigate the complex regulatory framework to resolve basic immigration problems.
  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Focuses on statutes and decisions governing transfer and risk distribution of potentially harmful events. Examines contract law and considers the business of insurance from the standpoint of regulators, courts, insurers and consumers.

  • ​This course will explore the role of intellectual property in business, addressing legal strategies, problems and opportunities related to founding, expanding, and terminating business organizations. The course will also focus on IP issues that commonly arise in the development, marketing and licensing of products. Much of the learning will be centered around business case studies. There will be group exercises and class presentations during the semester that will count toward a portion of the final grade. One exercise related to negotiations and licensing will allow for collaboration with business school students from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.  The final exam will be in take-home format.

  • Elective
    Credits: 4

    Surveys federal income tax law, especially as it relates to taxation of individuals.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Examines legal techniques for public regulation of the use of land. Casebook has a national focus, but additional focus is placed on the New York planning and zoning enabling statutes, which were extensively revised in the 1990s.

 

1 Credit​ each semester from Spring of Second year onwards in a Colloquia setting- to discuss both field placement/internships and to discuss how the courses they are taking relate to the field.

Research paper:

Written under faculty supervision on a relevant aspect of equine, racing or gaming law. The paper must qualify for the Law School's upper class writing requirement, and may or may not be used to satisfy that requirement.

(Effective November 6, 2012)

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