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Business Law

 

Requirements

24 credits, with at least 1​​5 credits from the following courses:

  • Title
  • Type
  • Credits
  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Introduces the field and discipline of financial accounting. This course seeks to acquaint the non-financial student with the general purposes of accounting and the role of independent accountants in business and society. Intended for lawyers who have a non-financial background, the student will be introduced to the mechanics and terminology of financial accounting and will learn the basic principles and procedures of accountancy in the preparation of financial statements. With this foundation, the student will learn the purpose behind each of the individual financial statements and how to analyze and interpret the financial statements.​​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Covers principles and operation of the Sherman Act, Clayton Act and Federal Trade Commission Act and their effect upon conduct, as opposed to structure, of American industry. Examines issues of price fixing, boycotts, exclusive dealing, territorial allocation, tie-ins, franchise terminations, and governmental immunity for anti-competitive regulations.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Introduction to rights and obligations of financially distressed debtors and their creditors. Analyzes the Federal Bankruptcy Code and the Code's impact on general non-bankruptcy law.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3
    This course surveys various areas of law that are important to businesses and their advisors, including: choosing the correct form of business entity, including tax and governance issues;licenses and permits; raising capital through equity and loans; business insurance; employment law; employee benefits; development and protection of intellectual property;and securities law issues. Paper course.
    Auditing allowed; Paper can be used for writing requirement.faculty approval.
  • Elective
    Credits: 4

    ​Discusses formation and organization of basic business organizations. Examines structure, finance, management, and control of business enterprises; rights and liabilities of owners, fiduciaries, and third parties; shareholder informational rights, shareholder suits and issuance of shares; and introduces problems of close corporations and state statutory and administrative regulations.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    Presents exercises in solving typical problems in the formation and operation of closely-owned small businesses, including business and financial considerations, and application of state and federal tax, partnership and corporation laws to such organizations. Business organizations and Introduction to Taxation are recommended, but not required prerequisites.​

  • ​This course is about how the criminal process addresses misconduct committed not just for the benefit of individuals, but also for the benefit of some collective entity.  In most such investigations or prosecutions, the entity is a business, such as a corporation or partnership, but it could also be a not-for-profit group or even a unit of government.  The course  will not spend much time on the substantive law of various crimes that are often charged against business conduct, but will focus on use of the criminal process with respect to entities themselves, with a view either toward the actual prosecution of such entities, or toward enlisting their cooperation in the prosecution of individuals.

  • ​Studies the rules governing federal taxation of corporations and their shareholders. Covers tax consequences to corporations and shareholders of corporate formations, distributions, redemptions, and liquidations.

    Prerequisite: Introduction to Taxation

  • ​Studies the rules governing the federal taxation of pass-through business entities, including partnerships, LLCs, LLPs, etc. Topics include tax consequences of the formation of pass-through entities, allocation of tax items to partners and members, distributions by pass-through entities, and sales of interests in these entities.

    Prerequisite: Introduction to Taxation

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Explores issues concerning sales transaction and payment mechanisms in modern commerce. Focuses primarily on domestic commercial transactions under Articles 1,2,3,4 and 5 of the Uniform Commercial Code and compares the law governing international transactions governed by the U.N. Convention on the International Sale of goods, and the Uniform Customs and Practices for Documentary Credits (UCP 500).

    Prerequisite: Contracts (required first-year course). Not open to students who have taken Commercial Law Survey or Sale of Goods. ​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Studies registration and prospectus requirements and exemptions for public and private offerings and sales of securities; regulation of securities transactions; regulation of corporate transactions such as mergers, acquisitions, takeovers, and tender offers; regulation of securities broker-dealers, exchanges and associations; and civil liabilities under the federal securities statutes.

    Prerequisite: Business Organizations ​

No more than 9 of the 24 credits fr​​om the following courses:

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Examines fundamental and practical issues of federal and New York administrative law. Deals with the scope of power of administrative agencies and the relationship of such agencies to other branches of government. ​​​

  • Examines application of the antitrust law to healthcare activities, including restrictions on healthcare advertising, enforcement of trade association ethical rules, peer review by hospitals, provider-payer relationships, physician joint ventures, and hospital mergers. ​

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Refers to a collection of statutory and common law recognized causes of action that arise out of business competition. Surveys these causes of action and analyzes them in the context of providing a source of protection to a business which is subject to potential economic harm from competitors, employees, suppliers, and others. Coverage will include false advertising, business defamation and disparagement, interference with contractual and prospective business relationships, misappropriation of trade values such as ideas, trade secrets, publicity rights, and mispresentation. Prohibitions against unfair and deceptive practices under the Federal Trade Commission Act will also be covered. Trademark issues fall outside the coverage of this course. Not open to students who have taken Unfair Trade Practices.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    The course will explore the issues concerning protection of intellectual creativity under the United States copyright laws; we will consider such matters as the nature of copyright, the statutory scheme, the kinds of works subject to copyright, and the extent of protection afforded those works. The grade will be based on performance on an end of semester examination.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Focuses on the legal requirements of electronic commerce including issues of electronic contracting, tort, defamation, constitutional law, intellectual property, procedural, domestic and international conflicts and regulation.

    Students who have taken Internet Law will not receive credit for this class.

  • ​Studies the establishment, operation, and regulation of retirement planning options under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act. Includes in-dept analysis of deferred compensation plans (qualified and non-qualified), stock options, pension and profit sharing plans, and employer-provided health benefits.
  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Surveys legal approaches to employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, disability, and age. Examines Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and other federal civil rights statutes.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to familiarize students with the matrix of legal protections available to employees and employers from the hiring process to the termination of the employment relationship. It encourages students to examine common law and statutory rights of the parties while considering policy implications of the employment law system. The substantive areas to be covered include hiring/firing, wages, hours, and benefits, conditions of employment, employment security, and occupational health and safety. Unlike labor law which can be roughly organized around one federal statute (National Labor Relations Act), employment law is found in hundreds of separate cases and statutes.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Focuses on developing general analytical framework for understanding environmental law, including development of common law, with emphasis on statutory and regulatory techniques for pollution control.

  • Dozens of field placement opportunities exist for second- third-year students. They spend a minimum of 10 hours per week​​ at their field placement site and participate in a one-hour weekly seminar.

    Note that most field placement​s need to be topic related and approved by a concentration advisor to count toward a degree.

  • ​The goal of this course is to introduce law students to basic concepts in finance essential in understanding more complex financial models. Following the basic introduction, the course focuses mainly on analysis of "derivative" instruments, how to use them in different economic situations, and the benefits/ consequences of helping clients set up contracts employing them when investing or conducting business, both locally and globally. The instruments are analyzed from two separate points of view: speculative and hedging. Tools and basic models that help in understanding the appropriate usage of different derivatives in different situations will also be introduced and examined.

    Through the course analysis, students will develop a thorough understanding of the models that influence and eventually determine the relationships among different derivative instruments. Cases are used to analyze actual situations and explore different possible solutions using derivatives, determining the best choice for the particular risk exposure in the case. The course will be taught on the assumption that the students have no prior knowledge of these financial instruments.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Focuses on statutes and decisions governing transfer and risk distribution of potentially harmful events. Examines contract law and considers the business of insurance from the standpoint of regulators, courts, insurers and consumers.

  • ​Examines topics related to conduct of international business: international private trade, U.S. and international regulation of trade, international private investment, international financial markets, international regulation of monetary affairs, and dispute resolution.

  • Elective
    Credits: 4

    Surveys federal income tax law, especially as it relates to taxation of individuals.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Covers the developing body of law governing relationships among employers, employees, and unions. Considers the impact of collective bargaining on rights of individual employees, management's prerogatives, and public welfare.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Introduces negotiation skills, offering hands-on experience preparing for and negotiating legal issues.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Examines the major bodies of United States law available for protecting intellectual property rights in inventions and discoveries. The majority of the course is devoted to studying patent law, including the patenting process, patent validity requirements, patent infringement, and the nature of rights secured by a patent. The course also covers trade secret law, including trade secret-eligible information, trade secret requirements, and the rights secured by a trade secret. The course concludes with an examination of the relationship between, and the relative advantages and disadvantages of, patent and trade secret law for protecting intellectual property rights.

 

Research pap​​er:

Written under faculty supervision on a relevant aspect of business law. The paper must qualify for the Law School's upperclass writing requirement, and may or may not be used to satisfy that requirement.

(Effective November 6, 2012)

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