Courses

Courses

  • Title
  • Type
  • Credits
  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Introduces the field and discipline of financial accounting. This course seeks to acquaint the non-financial student with the general purposes of accounting and the role of independent accountants in business and society. Intended for lawyers who have a non-financial background, the student will be introduced to the mechanics and terminology of financial accounting and will learn the basic principles and procedures of accountancy in the preparation of financial statements. With this foundation, the student will learn the purpose behind each of the individual financial statements and how to analyze and interpret the financial statements.​​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Examines fundamental and practical issues of federal and New York administrative law. Deals with the scope of power of administrative agencies and the relationship of such agencies to other branches of government. ​​​

  • Critical Race Theory participants will review the multiple ways in which the colorline and the U.S. legal system interact, from both a historical and a contemporary standpoint. To this end, we will examine numerous issues concerning racism and justice, including immigration, housing law, voting rights, criminal justice, employment discriminati​on, affirmative action, and remedies. Participants will complete weekly journals in addition to a paper of 25 or more pages. Guest lecturers will appear from time to time. Completion of this course satisfies the upper-level writing requirement.​

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    Examines evid​entiary topics not covered in the basic Evidence Class, such as judicial power to control presentation of proof, objections and reversible error, the Constitution as a source of evidence rules, spoliation of evidence, missing witness rule, and explores in depth the character evidence rule and various hearsay exceptions, such as the business records and public records exceptions. Prerequisite: Evidence. ​

  • Elective
    Credits: 4

    This course will build on and enhance analytical,writing and organizational skills with the goal of preparing the student for success on the bar exam. It will introduce the students to the following: content of the exam, subjects tested and the scoring system, proper study techniques, critical reading, thinking, issue spotting, and writing organized essay answers in IRAC format. In addition, the course will introduce the students to strategies for answering multiple choice questions, and time management and stress reduction techniques. It will also have a mentoring component.

    The subject matter will include an intensive review of selected subjects including but not limited to the six multi state subjects contracts, criminal law/criminal procedure, torts, constitutional law, property, and evidence. The problems and exercises used will be questions in the same format as bar questions. Students will be assigned homework/ exam questions before each class and will also answer exam questions during class under timed conditions. Written feedback will be provided on written essays and the MPT.​

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    This course is designed to prepare law students to become skilled legal researchers. Objectives for the course include: 1) showing students how to evaluate print and electronic legal research sources and using them effectively 2) expanding skills in primary and secondary Federal and NYS legal sources and 3) introducing students to the array of other legal resources that could be useful in legal practice. Topics covered in this course include: statutory codes, administrative codes, case law materials (reporters, digests, records and briefs), court rules, jury instructions, jury verdicts and settlements, restatements, uniform laws, form books, bankruptcy, legal ethics and taxation.​

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    Builds on the writing and analytical skills introduced in Lawyering. In addition, the course addresses audience and purpose, organization and classification, self-critique and revision, and style and clarity. Students work on several projects, including objective writings, persuasive writings, and drafting exercises.

    Builds on the writing and analytical skills introduced in Lawyering. Addresses audience and purpose, organization and classification, self-critique, and revision.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​This course will focus on four separate topics in American Legal History:  The Salem Witch Trials; the Trial of John Peter Zenger and the Development of Freedom of the Press; The Dred Scott Decision and the Problem of Slavery in the United States; and the Internment of the Japanese Americans in World War II. For each section we will read court documents, transcripts of arguments and testimony, cases, and documents generated by policy-makers, as well as short secondary readings on these subjects.  Students will be evaluated by writing a paper that may be used to fulfill the upper level writing requirement.

  • Examines application of the antitrust law to healthcare activities, including restrictions on healthcare advertising, enforcement of trade association ethical rules, peer review by hospitals, provider-payer relationships, physician joint ventures, and hospital mergers. ​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Examines legal and economic concepts of monopoly and monopolization, and integration of previously independent firms through horizontal, vertical, and conglomerate mergers under federal antitrust laws. ​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Covers principles and operation of the Sherman Act, Clayton Act and Federal Trade Commission Act and their effect upon conduct, as opposed to structure, of American industry. Examines issues of price fixing, boycotts, exclusive dealing, territorial allocation, tie-ins, franchise terminations, and governmental immunity for anti-competitive regulations.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    This course will introduce students to the legal principles, mechanics, and strategy of appellate advocacy, focusing largely on criminal cases. Students will learn about jurisdiction, finality, preservation of error, harmless error, standards of appellate review, the ethical responsibilities of appellate counsel, issue identification, drafting a statement of facts, constructing a legal argument, and oral argument. Using the record of an actual criminal trial, each student will brief and orally argue the appeal, for either the defendant or the prosecution.​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    This problem-solving course in health policy will integrate doctrinal instruction with experiential learning.  Students will learn substantive law and skills by participating in a variety of simulated exercises.  Students will also attend meetings held, for example, at Albany Medical Center, the Veteran’s Administration Hospital, and the New York State Department of Health. These meetings will give students exposure to the real-life workings of the health care system and an opportunity to determine how to approach a legal issue and give appropriate, practical advice.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Considers opportunities for practice in the field, copyright and trademark issues, contractual questions, examples of modern recording and publishing contracts and ownership issues. Actual case studies will be discussed.

    Prerequisite: Copyright or Introduction to Intellectual Property

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Introduction to rights and obligations of financially distressed debtors and their creditors. Analyzes the Federal Bankruptcy Code and the Code's impact on general non-bankruptcy law.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Explores bioethics issues such as clinical decision making, informed consent, organ donation and transplantation, physician assisted suicide, ethics in managed care, death and dying, and medical research.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3
    This course surveys various areas of law that are important to businesses and their advisors, including: choosing the correct form of business entity, including tax and governance issues;licenses and permits; raising capital through equity and loans; business insurance; employment law; employee benefits; development and protection of intellectual property;and securities law issues. Paper course.
    Auditing allowed; Paper can be used for writing requirement.faculty approval.
  • Elective
    Credits: 4

    ​Discusses formation and organization of basic business organizations. Examines structure, finance, management, and control of business enterprises; rights and liabilities of owners, fiduciaries, and third parties; shareholder informational rights, shareholder suits and issuance of shares; and introduces problems of close corporations and state statutory and administrative regulations.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Refers to a collection of statutory and common law recognized causes of action that arise out of business competition. Surveys these causes of action and analyzes them in the context of providing a source of protection to a business which is subject to potential economic harm from competitors, employees, suppliers, and others. Coverage will include false advertising, business defamation and disparagement, interference with contractual and prospective business relationships, misappropriation of trade values such as ideas, trade secrets, publicity rights, and mispresentation. Prohibitions against unfair and deceptive practices under the Federal Trade Commission Act will also be covered. Trademark issues fall outside the coverage of this course. Not open to students who have taken Unfair Trade Practices.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Children and the Law examines the distribution of power and interactions among the child, the family, and various state agencies. The course will explore the constitutional, statutory and common law rights of parents and children in various settings, including the child welfare system, the juvenile delinquency system, persons in need of supervision and the foster care system. Students will learn the different approaches for the role of the child’s attorney and analyze best practices for representing children in a wide range of legal matters, including tort law, contract law, criminal law, family law. The classroom is primarily lecture-based with opportunities to participate in classroom simulations, petition-drafting, and small group activities. ​

  • ​The Civil Rights and Disabilities Law Clinic provides law students with a rewarding opportunity to serve clients and develop professional skills.  Under faculty supervision, students represent clients in various administrative forums and state and federal courts.  Many clients are individuals with disabilities who are struggling against systemic barriers that interfere with their civil rights and independence.  Clinic students assist their clients in removing those barriers.  Through simulated exercises and the representation of clients, student interns will develop the skills necessary to be effective attorneys: persuasion, drafting, alternative dispute resolution, negotiation, interviewing, counseling, fact investigation, and trial practice.  Students will also have the opportunity to successfully navigate complicated bureaucracies and negotiate with local, state, and federal officials.  ​​​​

  • Focuses on prosecuting and defending a civil rights claim brought pursuant to 42 U.C.C. 167 1983. Deals with constitutional theory and interpretation, emphasizing practical aspects and procedural tactics inherent in suing or defending a civil rights claim in federal court.

  • Uses a client-centered approach to develop skills in using active listening, dealing with difficult clients, building questioning techniques, developing theories, identifying alternatives and consequences, and engendering client decision-making.

  • Compares the constitutional systems in the United States, Canada, Western and Eastern Europe, the Middle and Far East and Africa.​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Studies problems in cases having contact with two or more states or nations. Course has three basic components: jurisdiction, choice of law, and recognition and enforcement of sister-state and foreign judgments.

  • ​Examines the formative debates underlying the creation of the Constitution.

  • Required
    Credits: 4

    ​This is a survey course that deals with issues arising under the United States Constitution. Topics that may be covered include judicial review, separation of powers, scope of federal and state regulatory power, and the protection of individual rights.​

  • ​Laws regulating credit in the United States remained fairly static until the 20th Century. This course will examine the dramatic evolution of laws affecting consumer credit and the dergulations of these laws at the federal and state level, focusing upon the last thirty years. The course will address how these changes paved the way for positive innovation, and abuse.We will explore the various types of credit products, lenders, and the mechanisms that fund the lending system as well as the legislative and regulatory action prompted by the recent financial crisis.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    This course explores the various sources of law that impact upon consumer credit and other consumer transactions, including common law, state consumer legislation, federal consumer legislation, and federal consumer regulations. consumer problems discussed include deceptive trade practices, usury, credit terms, credit disclosures, credit discrimination, adhesive contractual provisions, and the liability of sellers, lenders, third parties, and assignees. Students will review fact problems and actual loan documents to assess consumer claims and defenses.

  • Required
    Credits: 5

    ​Covers principles governing the formation of the contract relation; reality of consent; capacity of the parties; consideration; legality of subject matter; form required under the Statutes of Frauds; construction and operation of contract; methods of discharge; illegal arrangements; remedies for breach; and statutory modifications of common law principles.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    The course will explore the issues concerning protection of intellectual creativity under the United States copyright laws; we will consider such matters as the nature of copyright, the statutory scheme, the kinds of works subject to copyright, and the extent of protection afforded those works. The grade will be based on performance on an end of semester examination.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​This course deals with issues arising from the separation of ownership and management that is inherent in the corporate form of business organization (as distinguished from the partnership form and the sole proprietorship), and the relative roles, powers, rights and obligations of, and the conflicts between, shareholders (owners) on the one hand and directors and officers (managers) on the other, with most of the attention, and jurisprudence, being focused on the publicly-held corporation. Students will survey the classic cases addressing the responsibilities of corporate directors and then move on to examine the more contemporary jurisprudence, particularly the headline-making Walt Disney litigation, and the growing body of "federal corporate law" in the wake of the Enron and WorldCom scandals. The course will explore such topics as the impact on management conduct of the threat of civil litigation and criminal prosecution, the decline of the "imperial CEO," differing notions of director independence, the shift from director passivity to director activism, the "balkanization" of corporate boards through committees, the trend toward enhanced shareholder empowerment in the nomination and election of directors, the differences between so-called "best practices" and legal mandates, and the application of political governance norms to management of the modern business corporation.

    This course is a seminar that will meet once each week for two hours, with class time spent mostly in discussion and problem solving.

    Prerequisite: Business Organizations.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​The goal of this course is to educate students in business and legal issues which arise in sophisticated corporate transactions. Business and legal considerations will be illustrated by examining the elements which constitute a leveraged buy-out of a publicly held business by the current management team. Considerations examined will include: basic financial projections, loan underwriting and documentation, venture capital terms and documentation, choice of entity considerations, issuance of stock to founders, vesting and Section 83(b) elections, asset acquisition documentation, and federal & state securities compliance.

    Prerequisite: Business Organizations.

    Suggested prerequites: Intro to Tax, Securities, Accounting for Lawyers

  • This course addresses the legal and equitable remedies of creditors and the protections afforded debtors who have entered into secured and unsecured transactions. Topics include: consensual liens in the real estate and personal property contexts; non-consensual liens; judicial and non-judicial collection rights; priority among competing creditors; debtor protections, including statutory and common law remedies; and Art. 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. 

    This course does not cover bankruptcy law. Not open to students who have taken Secured Transactions or Commercial Law Survey. This course will be offered in place of Mortgages and Liens and Secured Transactions. Some of the coverage of this course overlaps with Commercial Law Survey and students will not be allowed to enroll in both courses.

  • Required
    Credits: 3

    ​Examines the fundamental principles and doctrines of the law of crimes, including the elements of conduct and mind, defenses, justification, parties, and basic institutions and processes.

  • This is an advanced criminal law course organized around considering whether vice behaviors—gambling, narcotics, commercial and deviant sexual practices, pornography, and drinking—are the proper subjects of criminal prohibition, and, if so, with what means of enforcement and punishment. Vice behaviors have been the subject of radical changes over the past generation, making them an ideal laboratory for the study of the law reform process. The materials that will be used include statistical data, philosophical, historical and legal scholarship as well as policy analysis. The goal is to explore the phenomenon of the "Victimless Crime" and the interrelationship of law and morals.

  • Examines major steps in a criminal case from commencement of the criminal action through verdict. Focus is upon federal and New York procedure concerning: the decision to prosecute, including diversion; securing orders and pretrial detention; preliminary hearings; grand jury proceedings; subpoenas, immunity and contempt; accusatory instruments; discovery; speedy trial requirements; venue and venue change; pleas and plea bargaining; jury selection, voir dire and challenges; trial procedures; jury charges; and related practice.

    This course and Criminal Procedure Under the 4th, 5th, and 6th Amendments are designed to complement each other in a six-credit study of criminal procedure. Student may elect either course without taking the other.​

  • Examines basic constitutional constraints imposed on law enforcement in the investigation of crime. Primary topics include search and seizure, interrogation and confessions, right to counsel, fair trial, and self incrimination. 

    Professor Breger's class: This course examines - via extensive analysis of landmark federal constitutional cases - the federal regulation of law enforcement investigatory practices including searching and seizing under the Fourth Amendment, compelling confessions under the Fifth Amendment, and deliberately eliciting incriminating statements under the Sixth Amendment. Course themes include controlling police discretion, criminal procedure as Evidence law, class, ethnicity, race, the roles of the lawyers, and the use of social science research.

    Professor Farley's class: This course examines - via close readings of landmark federal constitutional cases - the regulation of law enforcement investigatory practices including searching and seizing under the Fourth Amendment, compelling confessions under the Fifth Amendment, and deliberately eliciting incriminating statements under the Sixth Amendment. Course themes will include discretion and ambiguity in the various roles that judges, defense lawyers, prosecutors, police, legal scholars, social science researchers and others play in the production of criminal procedure. Class power and racism will also be topics of discussion. There will be no final examination. In lieu of a final examination, each participant will keep a weekly journal and write a term paper.

    Professor Bonventre's class: The course examines the constitutional principles governing law enforcement in the United States through the decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court and of American State Supreme Courts. The course will emphasize the competing arguments, interests, and concerns involved in the various issues and in the different ways in which those issues are resolved by federal and state high courts. Students will be encouraged to understand the evolution, fluidity, and necessarily ideological character of constitutional criminal procedure law, and the importance of studying courts, judges, policy and politics, both to understand the case law and to be competent criminal law advocates. ​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Focuses on the legal requirements of electronic commerce including issues of electronic contracting, tort, defamation, constitutional law, intellectual property, procedural, domestic and international conflicts and regulation.

    Students who have taken Internet Law will not receive credit for this class.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    The course deals with the legal rights and remedies and constitutional inhibitions, developed and developing, related to defamation (libel and slander), the rights of privacy and publicity, artistic integrity and "moral right" The grade will be based on performance on an end of semester examination.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    Explores in depth the legal issues and discrete phenomena of domestic violence. Topics generally include intimate partner violence, criminal prosecution of batterers, child abuse and neglect, gay and lesbian battering, elder abuse, and the basis for intervention of the state. ​

  • In this graded one semester experience, students will be given the challenging opportunity to prosecute domestic violence crimes while acquiring basic lawyering and courtroom skills. Students will learn to interview victims and witnesses, analyze appropriate charging of crimes, engage in fact investigation and fact-gathering and, when appropriate, to conduct oral argument, hearings, and/or trials. Under the joint supervision of Professor Lynch and a specialized prosecutor, students will be assigned to work in specialized domestic violence courts in the Capital Region and begin practicing the skills learned in class. There are some opportunities for students to continue into a second semester for 3 credits and to concentrate on jury selection and advanced witness examination skills.

    Pre/Co-Requisite: Domestic Violence Seminar (must register separately)​​​

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Uses simulations to expose students to the skills necessary to prepare for and draft transactional documents designed to express a legal right, privilege, function, duty, status, or disposition.

  • ​This seminar will examine the role of identity in the distribution of wealth, drawing upon the jurisprudential contributions of classic market theory, critical race theory, law and economics, liberalism, libertarianism, feminist legal theory, and queer theory.  Students will probe the tensions between the marketplace distribution of commodities and the cultural determinants of market value, between economic efficiency and social equality, and between group rights and individual rights.  

    An important objective of this course is to enable students to recognize and interrogate structures of economic and social inequality, while exploring contemporary issues such as the sub-prime mortgage crisis, the ongoing economic recession, gentrification and affordable housing, affirmative action and desegregation, the economic borders of communities (immigration), and the restriction of public benefits to the needy. Students may elect to either complete a research paper satisfying the school's legal writing requirement, or take a final examination.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Provides an overview of legal and policy questions relating to aging individuals and an older and aging society.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​This course is an introduction to the legal and practical issues related to electronic discovery and the use of electronic evidence in legal proceedings. Attorneys engaged in litigation must ensure compliance with the amended Federal Rules of Civil Procedure through the preservation and production of electronically stored information. Firms nationwide are struggling with the practical challenges of electronic discovery and the law is continuously evolving. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the legal rules governing modern discovery and develop practical knowledge and key analytical skills that can be carried into practice.Each student is expected to read the assigned materials and contribute to the class discussion. In addition to the assigned readings, we will examine current legal issues involving electronic discovery, as they unfold in the courts and in the media.

  • ​Studies the establishment, operation, and regulation of retirement planning options under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act. Includes in-dept analysis of deferred compensation plans (qualified and non-qualified), stock options, pension and profit sharing plans, and employer-provided health benefits.
  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Surveys legal approaches to employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, disability, and age. Examines Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and other federal civil rights statutes.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to familiarize students with the matrix of legal protections available to employees and employers from the hiring process to the termination of the employment relationship. It encourages students to examine common law and statutory rights of the parties while considering policy implications of the employment law system. The substantive areas to be covered include hiring/firing, wages, hours, and benefits, conditions of employment, employment security, and occupational health and safety. Unlike labor law which can be roughly organized around one federal statute (National Labor Relations Act), employment law is found in hundreds of separate cases and statutes.

  • This course offers students the opportunity to work with faculty and students from the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at the University at Albany and will expose them to the science, art and law of entrepreneurship and emerging technologies. Students will not only receive grounding in the law of business development and intellectual property, but will also be steeped in the science behind nanoscale technologies so that they can practice effectively in this rapidly emerging field.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Focuses on developing general analytical framework for understanding environmental law, including development of common law, with emphasis on statutory and regulatory techniques for pollution control.

  • ​This course will examine the underpinnings of environmental and natural resources law by exploring the foundational ideas governing the use, protection and allocation of the environment and natural resources.  Among the subjects covered will be competing theories of entitlement, including those represented in the concept of property in the common law tradition, humans as conquerors or citizens of nature, the public trust, and nature as an economic resource. Drawing from both legal and non-legal sources, students will examine the historical circumstances of laws governing nature, will consider the modern application of those laws, and will investigate in depth the social, political and economic policy implications of regulating nature.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Focuses on general lifetime estate planning and estate planning at death based on the study of the relevant federal wealth transfer and income tax rules.

    Prerequisite: Trusts and Estates

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Drafting and planning techniques of general application (for both married and unmarried persons and for persons of moderate and little wealth) are emphasized throughout. The course also covers important lifetime directives, including durable powers of attorney for property, health care proxies and living wills. In lieu of an examination, Estate Planning II involves a project. Students form teams of 2 and 3 (although you can work alone should you so choose) and prepare a will and trust for a hypothetical married person, taking into account all relevant tax and non-tax factors. The team or individual can select New York or any other state law in doing the project. The project is designed to give you an experience transferable to actual practice.

    Estate Planning I is a prerequisite for Estate Planning II. ​

  • Required
    Credits: 4

    ​Presents detailed study of the rules governing the admissibility and use of evidence in trials and other legal proceedings.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Students will examine fact investigation in a variety of contexts through simulated exercises, class discussion, and lecture to identify sources of fact, obtain facts through formal and informal means, apply law to facts, develop case plans, and advise clients based on fact investigation in hypothetical cases.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Family Law examines state regulation and intrusion into the family and the constitutional limitations and rights therein. The course will introduce students to the primary triad of interests: the parents, the child and the state. Additionally, the course will introduce students to the evolution of families and how family law has responded to social change. Topics will include the varying definitions of a "family", the legal relationships between parent and child, the nature of marriage and civil unions, family after separation or divorce, child custody, paternity/maternity, child support, child abuse and neglect, termination of parental rights, the foster care system, adoption, domestic violence, reproductive rights, privacy, gender and caretaking, and the role of the family court system. Further, the course will examine issues of intersectionality based upon race and socioeconomic class. The classroom is primarily lecture-based with opportunities to participate in classroom simulations, petition-drafting, and small group activities.

  • ​The Family Violence Litigation Clinic offers students challenging and rewarding opportunities to argue cases in court on behalf of persons who have been victimized by violence by intimate partners or family members.  Students will learn about domestic violence dynamics and the substantive law and procedure of Family Court.  Students will be admitted to the limited practice of law under the Student Practice Order of the Appellate Division, Third Judicial Department.  Under direct faculty supervision, students will interview and counsel clients; conduct fact investigation and discovery; draft pleadings, correspondence, motions, stipulations and orders; perform legal research and analysis; regularly appear with clients in court; negotiate cases with opposing counsel as well as the lawyer for the children involved; and conduct full evidentiary trials.  Students may also have the opportunity to write or argue an appellate case, conduct administrative hearings, and engage in community outreach. 

    Pre/Co-Requisite: Domestic Violence Seminar (Must register separately)​

  • Required
    Credits: 4

    This course provides a survey of the common law, statutory and Constitutional foundations of federal civil procedure and the policy choices that underlie access to the Courts. It covers the procedures followed by the federal courts in civil (noncriminal) disputes and examines the ways in which common understandings of fairness shape the design of the civil procedural system. It is designed to familiarize students with the fundamental constructs of the federal civil judicial system. These constructs require an understanding of jurisdiction and venue, the law applied by the federal courts, pretrial procedures, jury trials, motions, and verdicts and judgments.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Explores the foundational principles and doctrines governing the legal and political relationship between the United States, the states, and Indian tribes.  Examines the history of federal Indian law and policy, tribal property rights, congressional plenary power, the trust doctrine, tribal sovereignty, and jurisdiction in Indian Country.  Focuses on current issues in Indian Law, including gaming, reservation economic development, fishing and hunting rights, cultural resource protection, and tribal rights in natural resources.

  • ​This course examines the proper role of the federal courts in the American political system. The ability of a litigant to invoke the jurisdiction of the federal courts is regulated by a variety of constitutional, statutory and judge-made doctrines. As such, topics explored will include: the case or controversy limitations contained in Article III, advanced topics in subject matter, diversity and supplemental jurisdiction, the availability of habeas corpus review, state sovereignty and the Eleventh Amendment, the abstention doctrines, the power of federal courts to create common law, removal actions, and 42 U.S.C.§1983 and Bivens civil rights actions.  Exploring the themes of federalism and separation of powers addressed in the basic Constitutional Law course, this course at its core examines the power of Congress to allocate judicial power among the federal courts, federal agencies and States. This course should prove to be particularly valuable to students who anticipate clerking for a federal or state judge, who plan to litigate before federal and state courts, or who are planning for a public interest or public sector career.

  • ​This course will examine the procedural aspects of tax controversies at the administrative and judicial levels. This course will focus on the law and procedure relating to disputes between taxpayers and the IRS beginning with audit of the return a taxpayer filed through tax litigation. This course will involve strategy and ethical considerations involved in representing a client before the IRS and the courts, as well as the theory underlying the procedural rules. This course will cover the following topics: tax research, tax compliance, obtaining information from the IRS, collection devices available to the IRS, joint and several liability, innocent spouse relief, taxpayer rights, administrative remedies, choice of judicial forum, and tax litigation.

  • ​Studies the rules governing federal taxation of corporations and their shareholders. Covers tax consequences to corporations and shareholders of corporate formations, distributions, redemptions, and liquidations.

    Prerequisite: Introduction to Taxation

  • ​Studies the rules governing the federal taxation of pass-through business entities, including partnerships, LLCs, LLPs, etc. Topics include tax consequences of the formation of pass-through entities, allocation of tax items to partners and members, distributions by pass-through entities, and sales of interests in these entities.

    Prerequisite: Introduction to Taxation

  • Dozens of field placement opportunities exist for second- third-year students. They spend a minimum of 10 hours per week​​ at their field placement site and participate in a one-hour weekly seminar.

    Note that most field placement​s need to be topic related and approved by a concentration advisor to count toward a degree.

  • ​This course provides an introduction to practical topics in estate and financial planning, including advance directives for financial management and health care decisions, long term care planning, revocable living trusts and retirement plans. In lieu of an examination, Financial Planning for the Elderly involves a project. Students form teams of two and three (though it is permissable to work alone) and prepare a plan for a hypothetical single person, taking into account all relevant gift and income tax and non-tax factors. The project includes draft documents and an explanatory cover letter to the hypothetical client. This course is designed to provide an experience transferable to practice.

    Prerequisite: Trusts and Estates

     
  • Covers the federal healthcare fraud protection laws relating to false claims, kickbacks, physician self-referrals, and hospital emergency treatment requirements. Examines the unique ways in which the healthcare industry is regulated to protect consumers and the federal healthcare programs (Medicare and Medicaid) from fraud.​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Explores feminist theory, constitutional equality, issues of gender and sexuality, intimate partner and family violence, childhood sexual abuse, reproduction, parenting and children, sexual harassment, sexual discrimination, trafficking and prostitution, and other topics relating to the intersection of gender and the law.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​The seminar will examine the theoretical and legal treatment of men's and women's labor in the public and private spheres, informal and formal sectors, unionized and non-unionized sectors and the international arena. The seminar is designed for students who are interested in examining the law's impact on the work that women and men do. It will draw on materials from labor history and theory, feminist legal theory, critical race theory, and domestic and international labor and human rights law.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Describes the medico-legal paradigm within which genetic technologies are presently pursued or restricted. Discusses the scientific basis of the genetic technologies providing students with basic appreciation of potential issues and a guide to the scientific, rather than the legal, literature related to the growing area of genomics. The course will be organized along six areas of the law: criminal law, family and property law, tort law, insurance law, labor law, and intellectual property law. No science background is required.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    Examines the historical view of governmental interaction with gambling in a number of fields, including the lottery, horse racing, casinos, charitable wagering, Indian gaming, and sports wagering.​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Covers ethical issues faced by members of the legislative, executive, and judicial brances of government at the federal, state and local levels. Covers special ethical responsibilities of attorneys in government service and the ethical obligations of government employees who are not attorneys.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​In this course we will read and discuss about 30 of the most important Supreme Court casees in our constitutional history. This is an opportunity to think about how judges write opinions and how opinions and rhetoric affect public policy. These are the cases every well educated lawyer should have read and know.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Examines legal issues involved in guardianship for minors and adults unable to make decisions for themselves.

  • ​Examines the structure and financing of our healthcare system, focusing on Medicare, Medicaid, and private health insurance.  Examines issues related to managed care, regulation of employer health benefit plans, and how health reform deals with the issue of the growing uninsured population.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​This survey course covers several topics essential to an understanding of the health-care system and the issues confronting health-care lawyers today. The topics are: health-care delivery systems; quality of and access to health care (including medical malpractice, institutional liability, and allocation of health-care resources); health-care professionals' rights and responsibilities (including professional licensure/discipline and institutional peer review); and patients' rights (including informed consent, advance directives, surrogate decisionmaking, research involving human subjects, determination of death, and anatomical gifts).​

  • The Health Law Clinic is designed to teach student interns to identify and address the legal issues which poor individuals living with chronic health conditions often face.  Through faculty supervised representation of clients living with, or affected by, HIV or cancer, participating students acquire a broad range of practical lawyering skills in the areas of client interviewing, factual investigation, case planning, client counseling, and litigation advocacy.  Student interns are admitted to practice under the Student Practice Rule which allows them to help clients access necessary health care, obtain public benefits, secure or maintain stable housing, establish court-approved emergency plans for the future care of children, and develop proxies which authorize health care agents to make health decisions.  Participating interns typically take from this experience both a heightened confidence in their lawyering abilities and a broader perspective of their role in ensuring access to justice for the needy.  Clinic clients typically report that the legal services provided relieve stress and allow them to focus their limited energy on their underlying health problems.

    Pre/Co-Requisite: None​​​​

  • ​Discusses the moral and legal issues concerning both ordinary and assisted reproduction. Covers constitutional and common law doctrine on reproductive liberty, government regulation, and medical control over procreative choice, the reproductive autonomy of minors, the effects of advances in cell biology on reproductive issues, and the rights and responsibilities of gamete contributors.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2
    ​Provides an introduction to immigration and naturalization policies in the United States. Considers constitutional, statutory, and regulatory authorities confronting individuals and society. Students learn to navigate the complex regulatory framework to resolve basic immigration problems.
  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Focuses on statutes and decisions governing transfer and risk distribution of potentially harmful events. Examines contract law and considers the business of insurance from the standpoint of regulators, courts, insurers and consumers.

  • ​This course will explore the role of intellectual property in business, addressing legal strategies, problems and opportunities related to founding, expanding, and terminating business organizations. The course will also focus on IP issues that commonly arise in the development, marketing and licensing of products. Much of the learning will be centered around business case studies. There will be group exercises and class presentations during the semester that will count toward a portion of the final grade. One exercise related to negotiations and licensing will allow for collaboration with business school students from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.  The final exam will be in take-home format.

  • ​Studies the treaty regimes and jurisprudence that protect trademark, copyright, and patent internationally. Related foreign policy, public policy, and human rights considerations are treated on a selected basis.

  • ​Examines topics related to conduct of international business: international private trade, U.S. and international regulation of trade, international private investment, international financial markets, international regulation of monetary affairs, and dispute resolution.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​nternational child rights will focus on interpretation and implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). The CRC, adopted by the General Assembly in 1989, is the most-ratified treaty in the world. The CRC addresses a wide variety of themes including discrimination, armed conflicts, prison, family life and education, to list just a few examples. This course will approach the CRC as it is understood by lawyers, by activists, and by academics from all around the world. participants will learn how to research and write in the area of international human rights, with a focus on child rights.

    Prior knowledge of International Law and Human Rights is not required. International Child Rights is open to all. Grading will be evaluated on the basis of papers and class participation. There will be no final examination.​

  • ​This seminar examines the origin, scope, and protection of international human rights both internationally and in domestic litigation. Students write a research paper on a topic of their choice. The paper is eligible to satisfy the upper year writing requirement, and the course satisfies the international law requirement.

  • ​An understanding of the fundamental principles and doctrines of international law that govern the use of force and the responsibility for war crimes and crimes against humanity. Among the topics covered are the limitations on the use of force and the resort to force, both nation-state and collective action, the treatment of combatants and civilians, and the recognition and prosecution of international criminal law including war crimes and crimes against humanity, as well as international cooperation, institutions and criminal liability.​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​This course will address modern forms of international law-making and regulations, as well as enforcement and dispute settlement, emphasizing especially the impact of institutions. It will examine how intergovernmental or international organizations, from those of the UN system to the World Trade Organization (WTO), have changed the traditional sources of international obligation, namely treaties, customary international law, and general principles.

  • A nation's participation in world trade is often viewed as key to its economic growth and development. This seminar provides an introduction to international trade law with a primary focus on the World Trade Organization (WTO) and its regulation of trade in goods, services, intellectual property, and foreign direct investment.  Students analyze problems of law and policy of their choice in a research paper.  Students are invited but not required to focus the research paper on a problem relevant to developing countries, which comprise two-thirds of the membership of the WTO. 

    No background in international law or economics is required. The paper may be used to satisfy the upper year writing requirement, and the class satisfies the international law requirement.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    An introductory seminar to introduce students to contemporary Chinese law and legal institutions. The course involves a Shanghai, China, trip with lectures at the Shanghai Institute of Foreign Trade and visits to government, judicial and law firm offices in Shanghai during spring break.

    *This course requires additional tuition to cover the China trip.

  • ​Introduces fundamental components of intellectual property law, focusing on patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets.

  • Required
    Credits: 2
    ​Combines legal research, legal writing, clinical methodology, and professional skills development to introduce what lawyers do and how the legal system works. Students represent a plaintiff or defendant in a simulated lawsuit, from initial client interview to appeal.
  • This offering is designed as a course in the basic lawyering skills, with the litigation process as its focus.  

    The course has three components: a practice component, a simulation component, and a classroom component.  

    In the practice component, students represent clients in hearings and appeals involving unemployment benefits.  All cases are referred by the Legal Aid Society of Northeastern New York.  Students assigned to represent each client complete the following legal tasks under the supervision of the Clinical Professor: client interviewing; fact investigation; legal research; case planning; preparation of pleadings and all other court papers; and witness preparation and client representation in administrative proceedings and state court.  

    In the simulation component, each student participates in a semester-long simulation representing a client and performing the basic legal tasks required in the practice component.  

    In the classroom component, the legal tasks performed in the simulation and practice components are the subject of lecture and discussion.  

    This progressively challenging approach involves classroom lecture and discussion, simulation, and actual casework, offering law students an ideal introduction to the performance of lawyering tasks. 

    Students are admitted to the limited practice of law under the Student Practice Rule.

    Pre/Co-Requisite: None

    ​​​
  • Elective
    Credits: 4

    Surveys federal income tax law, especially as it relates to taxation of individuals.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    Examines principal issues in patent, copyright,trademark, trade secret, and software licensing.Topics include standard terms and conditions of a technology license, negotiating royalty rates, and the impact of licensing on development and/or commercialization of technology.

  • Issues in Law and Society: Bread and Roses will focus on the Lochner Era, the Red Scare, the 8-Hour Day Movement, and the theories and practices of the Industrial Workers of the World (I.W.W. or "Wobblies"). The theories and practices of the I.W.W. will be used as reference points for an examination of present-day legal debates including but not limited to globalization, civil liberties after 9/11, the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, and problems with prisons.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Examines the judicial role. Focuses on creation and development of case law, theoretical and practical restraints on judges, and competing ideas regarding the nature of the judicial role in a constitutional democracy.

  • ​This seminar considers the relationship between law, justice, and morality.  Questions considered include: what is law? What are legal rules? What are rights?  What is the relation of law to justice in the modern regulatory state? Readings include historical material (e.g., ancient Greek and Roman writers) through to contemporary legal theory (e.g., law and economics, feminist legal theory, critical race theory, and postmodernism).  Students apply these perspectives to particular problems of law and policy in a research paper.  The paper may be used to satisfy the upper year writing requirement.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Analyzes use of arbitration to resolve both private and public sector labor disputes. Covers contract interpretation, disciplinary arbitration, and strategies and techniques in presenting an arbitration case.

    Prerequisite: Labor Law or Labor Law in the Public Sector

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Covers the developing body of law governing relationships among employers, employees, and unions. Considers the impact of collective bargaining on rights of individual employees, management's prerogatives, and public welfare.

  • Explores statutory and constitutional framework of collective bargaining in the public sector. Emphasizes a comparative approach to problems of strikes, organizational activity, bargaining frameworks, impasse resolution, and administration of collective bargaining agreements.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Examines legal techniques for public regulation of the use of land. Casebook has a national focus, but additional focus is placed on the New York planning and zoning enabling statutes, which were extensively revised in the 1990s.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Psychoanalysis deals with banished memories. The past, according to the psychoanalysts, remains with us complete and entire. Traumatic events can be buried or covered over but never obliterated. Law, like psychoanalysis, is concerned with the temporal roots of the troubled present. Troubles that seem new to the parties in conflict have in fact been with us always. Sexism, racism, economic hierarchy, to give just a few examples, repeat themselves again and again and again in our individual and collective lives, and this can be seen in our legal history. This course will apply the principles of psychoanalysis as a way to understand and explore the repetitions and symptoms of our jurisprudence.  Evaluation will be based on a 20 - 25 page paper and class participation.

  • This course explores the role of the lawyer as creative problem solver.  In it, students assess the strategies and tools lawyers use to promote social innovation and solve some of the world’s most pressing problems.  Students put the skills they have developed throughout law school to use in contexts where those skills are most desperately needed.  They also hone additional skills that every lawyer needs: e.g., the ability to work effectively in groups, run a productive meeting, collaborate on document drafting and production, think creatively to construct elegant solutions to complex problems, “pitch” ideas, and conduct group presentations.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​This course is a general introduction to the body of domestic and international law developing daily to grapple with catastrophic anthropogenic climate change. The course begins with a general overview of current climate science, and the policy, economics, and legal framework of the law of climate change. The next module covers an introduction to international environmental law, including the climate treaties and current negotiations. We will explore the growing theories of international human rights to a clean environment and stable climate, and the attempts to locate and enforce these rights in international and U.S. law. Turning to domestic law we will examine the sources of law that govern the principal sources of greenhouse gases, both federal judicial and administrative law. Our exploration begins with the Clean Air Act, public nuisance theory, and other litigation concerning transportation and energy generation, two of the greatest contributors to greenhouse gas emissions. We will examine pending federal legislation. The course will then turn to regional, state and local initiatives to mitigation of and adaptation to the effects of climate change. The course will be conducted two-thirds in the classroom and one-third online. We will conduct several exercises and a simulated litigation of a climate change-related case.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​This small course/seminar will explore the way law was used to create slavery in British American in the 17th century and then how the American states and the American nation developed an elaborate system of slave law. We will consider slaves as property, the criminal law of slavery, the relationship between race and slavery, how slaves could become free, and constitutional issues involving fugitive slaves, slavery in the territories, and the overall constitutional structure. Students will be evaluated by writing a paper that may be used to fulfill the upper level writing requirement.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​This course will introduce students to technology transfer law, more particularly the Bayh-Dole Act and its several amendments. March-In Rights and the underlying petition process will be examined along with pertinent case law. In addition, this course will examine the effects of legislation governing technology transfer from federal laboratories for commercialization purposes.

  • Elective
    Credits: 1

    Students learn the practical aspects of a standard house closing including real estate acquisition, disposition, and financing, focusing on negotiating and drafting the documentation necessary to effectuate the transaction. Special focus on handling escrow funds.

    Prerequisites: Property I and Property II.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    Focuses on in-class presentations by students on legal and ethical issues present in the medical records of hypothetical obstetrical or gynecological patients. Law students work in teams with resident physicians in obstetrics and gynecology.

  • Required
    Credits: 1
    A required first-year course for selected students, Legal Methods concentrates on enhancing students' skills. It involves completing written and oral exercises in case reading, briefing, analyzing, synthesizing, note taking, outlining, communicating and exam taking skills. The course also addresses study habits, time management, and stress reduction. 1 credit Pass/Fail.
  • This course offers students an opportunity to look closely at the process of innovation and technological development in the United States. Throughout the course students will be given the opportunity to place innovation in the context of law and regulation by considering how areas such as products liability, business financing, securities regulation, and otherwise apparently disparate areas of the law can affect development of new ideas and new technologies. This course will include both law students and students from the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, and thus will allow for interaction of law students with technical students, providing great breadth to the understanding students will gain from taking this course. The course is offered on a pass/fail basis only.
  • Required
    Credits: 3

    ​An examination of the Code of Professional Responsibility and Model Rules of Professional Conduct; a study of the organization of the bar and the function of the organized bar; and consideration of the individual attorney's professional responsibility for public service. ​

  • Introduces the creation, interpretation and implementation of statutory law. Topics will include legislative process (both federal and New York State), judicial interpretation of statutes, and agency implementation of statutes. Emphasizes the application of legislative and interpretive theory to legal practice.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    Focuses on professional liability and cases concerning numerous health-care professionals, including physicians. In addition, students study statutory reforms enacted to modify the common law so as to decrease the costs of malpractice liability. Explores the relationship between malpractice and professional misconduct. Institutional liability is addressed as a complement to (and possibly a future replacement for) professional liability.

  • ​Studies substantive and procedural law pertaining to marital dissolution, combining conceptual analysis with practical matters involved in representing a client with a matrimonial problem.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Provides 25 hours of training equivalent to the New York State Unified Court System training program for community mediators. Prepares students to serve as court-affiliated mediators and to counsel clients more effectively regardless of their area of law.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​The laws governing people with mental illness, mental retardation and other cognitive disabilities straddle the fault lines between individual liberty, the obligation to protect those who are incapacitated, and the desire to safeguard us from those whom we deem dangerous.  This Seminar will provide an overview of the civil laws and policies reflecting these often conflicting goals.  We will cover subjects of importance to general legal practice, as well as to the representation of folks with mental disabilities. 

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Introduces negotiation skills, offering hands-on experience preparing for and negotiating legal issues.

  • Examines issues regarding New York State's administrative procedure act, adjudication and rule making by New York State agencies, and the relationship such agencies to other branches of state government.​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Covers civil procedure in New York courts, concentrating on the supreme court, but with references, as necessary, to differentiated practices in lower courts of civil jurisdiction. Examines practice and procedure in the New York courts in detail, from commencement of the action through pleadings and parties.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Continues New York Practice I, covering service of pleadings, pretrial motion practice, pretrial discovery, provisional remedies, calendar practice, judgments, appeals, enforcement of judgments, and special proceedings.

    Prerequisite: New York Practice

  • ​Provides students with an in-depth knowledge of Patent Prosectuion and Drafting. Focuses on providing a student with the skills and knowledge necessary to assist a client/inventor in obtaining a patent, from the initial step of meeting with an inventor through post patent issuance procedures.

    Prerequisites: Patents & Trade Secrets or Introduction to Intellectual Property.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Examines the major bodies of United States law available for protecting intellectual property rights in inventions and discoveries. The majority of the course is devoted to studying patent law, including the patenting process, patent validity requirements, patent infringement, and the nature of rights secured by a patent. The course also covers trade secret law, including trade secret-eligible information, trade secret requirements, and the rights secured by a trade secret. The course concludes with an examination of the relationship between, and the relative advantages and disadvantages of, patent and trade secret law for protecting intellectual property rights.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​This course explores the evolution and application of various theories of liability (negligence, misrepresentation, breach of warranty, and strict liability) that may be asserted against manufacturers and other sellers of dangerous products. In addition to covering the basic doctrine of products liability law, the course addresses questions facing the practitioner attempting to prosecute or to defend a products liability claim: problems of procedure, proof, evidence, choice of theories of recovery, and alternative remedies.

  • ​Provides a comprehensive overview of the rules of legal ethics and an opportunity for in-depth study of a particular professional responsibility issue selected by the student.

    An alternative to the required course, the Legal Profession.

  • Required
    Credits: 2

    Surveys theory and doctrine involving ownership, possession and transfer of real and personal property. Topics covered may include: discovery, creation, capture, adverse possession, transfers of land, and recording acts.

  • Required
    Credits: 4

    Continues the survey of property law.  Topics covered may include: present and future estates; co-ownership, leaseholds, nuisance, servitudes, zoning, and takings.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Explores role of government in protecting and promoting public health and safety. Examines legitimacy of public health activities and explores sources of authority for public health action. Introduces the sciences of biostatistics and epidemiology.

  • ​This course will explore the origins of the current healthcare crisis, systematically examine some of the current methods for containing healthcare spending, and probe whether those methods are successful and equitable. The course will also explore the government's role in dealing with bioethical issues regarding, inter alia, physician assisted suicide, reproductive technologies, cloning, stem cell research, and organ transplantation.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Introduces students to major components of public international law. Topics include the nature, sources, and modes of application of international law; jurisdiction of nation-states over persons and territory; sovereign immunity; recognition and state succession; international claims and agreements; and authorized and unauthorized use of force. ​

  • Elective
    Credits: 1

    ​Students learn the practical aspects of a standard house closing including real estate acquisition, disposition, and financing, focusing on negotiating and drafting the documentation necessary to effectuate the transaction. Special focus on handling escrow funds.

    Prerequisites: Property I and Property II.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Examines standard residential and commercial real estate transactions, including consideration of brokerage arrangements, contracts of sale, methods of financing, methods of title protection, mortgage markets, construction loans, permanent financing, and federal income tax issues. The course will include instruction in drafting and one or more other professional skills.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Examines corrective measures that may be taken in the legal system to rectify the violation of a legal right. Considers and evaluates questions of what forms of relief, both equitable and legal, may be given and upon what conditions.

  • The number of elderly Americans is projected to increase significantly over the next few decades. Life expectancy is still increasing; the economy and job growth are sluggish; millions of Americans lack adequate health insurance; health care costs are rising at a rate far higher than the general inflation rate; and the Administration and state governments are attempting to implement the Affordable Care Act in the face of budgetary constraints and implacable opposition from certain groups. In view of these factors, issues involving retirement planning, health care and the elderly will continue to be important for the foreseeable future, and will offer public and private job opportunities to our graduates. Accordingly, I think that it would be beneficial for us to offer a course that will give them a solid introduction to these topics without excessive duplication of issued already adequately covered in other courses. The new course will replace the existing Employee Benefits course which we have offered for many years, though not every year.

    The course will cover:

    1.      Federal pension law under ERISA and the Internal Revenue Code;

    2.      Social Security and Medicare coverage and benefits, including policy and financial issues; and

    3.       The major new rules under the Affordable Care Act relating to access to health care, how health care is provided and financed, patient protections, employer-provided benefits  and quality improvement.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Explores issues concerning sales transaction and payment mechanisms in modern commerce. Focuses primarily on domestic commercial transactions under Articles 1,2,3,4 and 5 of the Uniform Commercial Code and compares the law governing international transactions governed by the U.N. Convention on the International Sale of goods, and the Uniform Customs and Practices for Documentary Credits (UCP 500).

    Prerequisite: Contracts (required first-year course). Not open to students who have taken Commercial Law Survey or Sale of Goods. ​

  • (Fall Registration Only - This clinic is a year-long experience.)

    This course will familiarize students with securities arbitration law. Students will study the statutes and regulations governing broker-dealers (brokerage firms) and registered representatives (stock brokers). Students also will represent eligible investors, under faculty supervision, in arbitration proceedings sponsored by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority or FINRA. Through in-class exercises and client representation, students will be trained in fact investigation, witness interviewing, early case assessment, the use of expert witnesses, the preparation of pleadings, discovery, and arbitration practice (including opening and closing statements, witness examinations, and the presentation of evidence).

    Pre/Co-Requisite: Securities Regulation (or comparable experience)​​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Studies registration and prospectus requirements and exemptions for public and private offerings and sales of securities; regulation of securities transactions; regulation of corporate transactions such as mergers, acquisitions, takeovers, and tender offers; regulation of securities broker-dealers, exchanges and associations; and civil liabilities under the federal securities statutes.

    Prerequisite: Business Organizations ​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Explores the response of the legal system to issues of human sexuality and the influence of legal norms on perception and understanding of human sexuality. Focuses on availability and limitations of constitutional and statutory protection for sexual privacy, expression, and equality. Surveys approaches of feminist and gay legal theorists to such questions as identity representation and performance. Uses legal and theoretical frameworks to examine issues in particular contexts, including the family, the workplace, public schools, the media, the U.S. military, and the criminal law.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Examines legal issues associated with the U.S. sports industry. Studies amateur and professional sports, with particular emphasis on horse racing laws and rules.

  • ​This course will examine environmental regulation and enforcement by state and local governments relating to stormwater and erosion control, forest and groundwater resources, essential public facilities siting, habitat protection and open space provision, among others.  The course will consider sources, scope and limitations in the authority of local governments to pursue an environmentally protective regime, the potential constitutional liabilities of government in regulating the use of the natural environment, and the conservation potential of the traditional tools that local governments wield (including planning and zoning, exactions, eminent domain, building codes).  This course will also look to emerging trends in local environmental law, including green buildings, sustainable development ordinances, environmental planning and climate change strategies.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Introduces structure, powers, and functioning of local governments and their interaction with the state. Topics include constitutional nature of local governments, incorporation, annexation, home rule, special districts and authorities, real property assessment and taxation, public access to information and meetings, state and local finance, and land use controls.  

  • This course examines the legal foundation for states and local governments to incur debt (municipal securities) and finance infrastructure. It reviews the federal law regulating the sale of municipal securities and disclosure requirements for investors, and federal law which permits interest on municipal securities to be tax-exempt. These fundamentals are examined through various financing structures employed by Wall Street investment bankers, together with case law and think-tank policy which guide the development of the modern municipal securities marketplace.​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Examines state and local tax issues with emphasis on New York tax issues.

  • Examines the role of American state courts in the development and protection of individual liberties, as well as in deciding issues of public law generally, as a matter of independent state law. Includes historical background of judicial review in the state courts, the re-emergence and methods of state-based adjudication, dynamics between the U.S. Supreme Court and state high courts, and recent developments and future of independent state law and decision-making.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3
    ​Analyzes nature and functioning of state constitutions in general and New York's in particular. Complete scope of subjects is discussed, in addition to comparison among various state constitutions.
  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Provides exposure to technical skills needed to represent clients successfully in estate matters. Emphasizes procedural aspects of estate work and precise methodology to present the client's case, as petitioner or objectant.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    This seminar will deal with various proposals for reform of federal and state tax laws. Particular attention will be devoted to issues currently pending in Congress and state legislatures. Problem areas will be reviewed from an economic, social and practical, as well as legal standpoint. The first half of the course will be devoted to a study of the basic underlying principles and objectives of a tax system. Coverage will include the ability to pay concept, redistribution of wealth, the influence of the tax system on socially desirable and undesirable conduct, the use of taxation to regulate the economy, the regressive nature of the Federal social security tax and state sales tax, and various state issues such as the financing of public education and local government services through the property tax. During the second part of the course each student will analyze in depth a specific area of the student's own choosing and will conduct a session of the seminar at which his/her conclusions and recommendations will be reviewed by the other members of the class.

    Prerequisite: introduction to Taxation.​​

  • Required
    Credits: 4

    ​Covers elements of intentional torts, including battery, assault, conversion, trespass, false imprisonment, privileges and defenses; elements of negligence, including duty, breach, causation, and damages; contributory negligence and comparative fault; and vicarious liability

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    The course deals with the creation, enforcement, and limitation of trademark rights, including the impact of technological change (such as the use of the internet) on traditional concepts, and related unfair competition issues. The grade will be based on performance on an end of semester examination. ​

  • Students who participate in the Transactions and Tax Law Clinic will gain meaningful and transferrable experience in representing individuals, small businesses and not-for-profits with tax and other legal matters that arise throughout the course of representation.  Transactional lawyers work with clients to produce effective and workable plans for the future and their services add value to their individual client’s personal and financial well-being or to an organization’s financial and organizational stability.  Students in this clinic will provide transactional legal services to New York not-for-profit corporations, start-up for profit businesses and individuals, and will gain exposure to clients and corporations with diverse backgrounds and legal needs.   While this clinic is primarily transactional, students in this clinic will also handle matters that involve controversy work with the Internal Revenue Service, the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance and the United States Tax Court.  

    Students in this clinic will gain skills in interviewing, counseling, fact investigation, complex legal research and will be required to explore and apply the ethical and substantive doctrinal rules applicable to the representation of individual and corporate clients. 

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​Introductory advocacy course in which students learn the tactical and ethical aspects of trial preparation and presentation. The course covers techniques for direct and cross-examination of witnesses. Lectures and demonstrations are combined with student presentations of various aspects of jury trials.

    Students who have already taken Trial Practice II may not take this course for credit.

  • Elective
    Credits: 2

    ​This course focuses on trial-court methodology, commencing with voir dire, opening statements of counsel, direct and cross-examination of parties and witnesses, closing arguments, and jury instructions.

    *Not open to a student who has taken or is currently taking Trial Practice.

  • ​Exposes students to a progression of pretrial skills necessary to represent a client from client interview up to the actual trial. Students are assigned to represent either the plaintiff or the defendant in a simulated case and take the case through every stage of the pretrial process. Students conduct a client interview, perform informal fact investigation, draft a complaint and an answer, serve interrogatories and answers to interrogatories, conduct a deposition and draft a Motion for Summary Judgement and memorandum of law based on the discovery that they have done. Students are required to attend a weekly on-hour lecture and participate in a two-hour lab where pretrial skills are practiced.

  • ​Exposes students to a progression of pretrial skills necessary to the defense and prosecution of a criminal case.  Students are assigned to represent either the prosecution or the defendant in a simulated criminal case and take the case through every stage of the pretrial process. Students conduct a client/victim interview, perform fact investigation and legal research, draft and respond to criminal charges, demands to produce, motions for discovery, and requests for suppression of evidence.  Students will draft a memorandum of law based on their legal and factual  investigation. Students may also draft and respond to demands for inspection of Grand Jury Minutes, engage in plea negotiations, conduct oral advocacy on arraignment and bail issues, and perform other pretrial matters as time and the selected problem allows. Students are required to attend a weekly one-hour lecture and participate in a two-hour lab where pretrial skills are practiced.

  • Exposes students to a progression of pretrial skills necessary to the defense and prosecution of a criminal case. Students are assigned to represent either the prosecution or the defendant in a simulated criminal case and take the case through every stage of the pretrial process. Students conduct a client/victim interview, perform fact investigation and legal research, draft and respond to criminal charges, demands to produce, motions for discovery, and requests for suppression of evidence. Students will draft a memorandum of law based on their legal and factual investigation. Students may also draft and respond to demands for inspection of Grand Jury Minutes, engage in plea negotiations, conduct oral advocacy on arraignment and bail issues, and perform other pretrial matters as time and the selected problem allows. Students are required to attend a weekly one-hour lecture and participate in a two-hour lab where pretrial skills are practiced. ​

  • Using the same simulated case from the fall semester Trial Practice I: Criminal Pretrial Skills class, students learn the trial skills necessary to conduct the trial of the case.  During the weekly two hour labs each student will prepare and conduct the following: introduction and use of exhibits, making and responding to objections, direct and cross-examination of lay witnesses, impeachment, refreshing recollection and past recollection recorded, direct and cross of an expert, opening statements, and summation.  At the end of the semester, the students team up to conduct a trial of the case in which each side presents at least two lay witnesses and an expert witness.  Students are required to attend a weekly one-hour lecture and participate in a two-hour lab where trial skills are practiced.

    Recommended:  Evidence & Trial Practice I: Criminal Pretrial Procedure ​

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    ​Focuses on laws of interstate succession; execution, revocation, probate, and construction of wills; non-probate transfers; nature and creation of express, resulting and constructive trusts; powers of appointment; and fiduciary administration.

  • Elective
    Credits: 3

    Students will role-play the justices on cases currently in front of the Court, examine pressing issues in constitutional law from each justice’s perspective, and explore the impact of the justices’ competing approaches both for emerging law and for counsels’ strategy in preparing and presenting cases. The Roberts Court is having a major impact on American law and students will get to see it up close. We plan to go to Washington to observe oral arguments in the cases studied. In past years, students' analyses of the justices have been published.

​​​​​