From Day One, Harrison Helps Students Prepare for Careers in Law

1/31/2014 | Facebook | Twitter | Email

As assistant director for student and recent graduate relations, Emily Harrison works with students on an individual basis to help develop a strategic plan to build their resume and body of experience, with the ultimate goal of a fulfilling and viable career path.

“The Career Center should be used regularly, beginning with the first semester of law school,” said Harrison, who has been with the law school for six and a half years. “We can help students build a compelling resume, practice interviewing, and identify internships that speak to their interests and will help make them more attractive candidates.”

The Career Center organizes dozens of events for students each semester, bringing alumni and other legal practitioners to campus to conduct interviews, talk about various legal niches and career paths, and connect directly with students.

“Our events allow students to simultaneously learn about different practices areas and build their professional networks,” said Harrison, noting a “J.D. Pathways to the Profession” event to be held on Feb. 13, 2014, which will include panel discussion and speed networking components.

Each fall, the Career Center also hosts a Public Sector Forum. Last year, more than 60 public sector employers representing a broad spectrum of practice areas, including government agencies, the legislature, judiciary, district attorney offices and civil legal service organizations, came to campus to meet with students. The Private Sector Forum, also held each fall, brings law firms and other companies to campus to talk to students.

“We can help students build a compelling resume, practice interviewing, and identify internships that speak to their interests and will help make them more attractive candidates.”

Harrison also helps students identify other opportunities on campus, noting that employers increasingly expect to see experience on a student’s resume, which can include some combination of Clinic work, research, journal membership or pro bono service.

“Every student comes into law school with a different background and different career goals,” said Harrison. “Despite these different backgrounds, every student has some transferable skill that they can apply to their career path. In the Career Center, it is our job to help identify what those skills are, provide students with the resources and direction to build their experience and skill-set, and to encourage students to take advantage of the wide range of opportunities that are available to them.”