Fordham Professor to Deliver Matthews Lecture on Racism in Latin America as Part of Dean's Book Series

1/17/2014 | Facebook | Twitter | Email

Professor Tanya Hernandez will discuss her book Racial Subordination in Latin America: The Role of the State, Customary Law and the New Civil Rights Response at the 2014 Judge James Campbell Matthews Lecture, to be held as part of the Dean’s Book Series at the law school on Feb. 10 at 4:00 p.m.

Although there are approximately 150 million people of African descent in Latin America, Afro-descendants have been consistently marginalized as undesirable elements of the society. Racial Subordination in Latin America examines the existence of customary laws of racial regulation and the historic complicity of Latin American states in erecting and sustaining racial hierarchies.

Professor Hernandez, of Fordham University School of Law, teaches Comparative Employment Discrimination, Critical Race Theory, The Science of Implicit Bias and the Law: New Pathways to Social Justice, and Trusts & Wills. She received her A.B. from Brown University and her J.D. from Yale Law School, where she served as note topics editor of the Yale Law Journal.

She was awarded a non-resident faculty fellowship at the Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality for 2011 to 2013. She has previously served as a law and public policy affairs fellow at Princeton University, a faculty fellow at the Institute for Research on Women at Rutgers University, and as an independent scholar in residence at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. Hispanic Business Magazine selected her as one of the 100 Most Influential Hispanics of 2007. 

Although there are approximately 150 million people of African descent in Latin America, Afro-descendants have been consistently marginalized as undesirable elements of the society.

Professor Hernandez serves on the editorial board of the Latino Studies Journal. Her scholarly interest is in the study of comparative race relations and anti-discrimination law, and her work in that area has been published in the California Law Review, Cornell Law Review, Harvard Civil Rights Civil Liberties Law Review and the Yale Law Journal, amongst other publications.

Judge James Campbell Matthews, Class of 1870, was Albany Law School’s first African-American graduate and New York state’s first African-American judge. As a lawyer, he argued and won the case to desegregate Albany’s public schools.

The event is free and open to the public. For more information, contact ncrou@albanylaw.edu or 518-445-3208.

This program has been approved for 1 CLE credit in New York state. This course will fulfill the following CLE requirements for newly admitted and experienced attorneys: Areas of Professional Practice Credits –1

Access CLE form here.

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