Albany Law School Promotes Hirokawa, Hill, Rogerson

Albany Law School Promotes Hirokawa, Hill, Rogerson

7/22/2014 | Facebook | Twitter | Email
 

Albany Law School recently promoted three professors: Keith Hirokawa to Associate Professor of Law with tenure; Dorothy Hill to Lawyering Professor; and Sarah Rogerson to Associate Clinical Professor.

Professor Hirokawa has been a part of the faculty at Albany Law School since 2009, teaching courses in environmental and natural resources law, land use planning, property law, and jurisprudence. He was previously an Associate Professor at Texas Wesleyan University School of Law and an Adjunct Professor at the University of Oregon School of Law. He has authored dozens of professional and scholarly articles on local environmental law, ecosystem services policy, watershed management, and environmental impact analysis, and practiced land use and environmental law in Oregon and Washington. Professor Hirokawa earned his J.D. at the University of Connecticut and his LL.M. in Environmental and Natural Resources Law at Lewis and Clark Law School, Oregon.

 

Professor Hill was most recently Associate Lawyering Professor at Albany Law School, teaching Employment Discrimination and Introduction to Lawyering and co-coordinating the school’s peer writing program. Her scholarship focuses on the immigration and labor issues faced by low-wage workers and guest workers. She has experience across the country working in Attorney Generals’ offices, including serving two years as Assistant Attorney General/Labor Counsel for the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Previously, Professor Hill was an associate attorney at Cohen, Weiss, and Simon LLP, New York, NY. She earned her B.A. at Vassar College, New York, and her J.D. at the University of Wisconsin Law School. 

 

Professor Rogerson, who was also recently named co-director of the Albany Law Clinic & Justice Center, was previously Assistant Clinical Professor of Law at Albany Law School. Professor Rogerson’s scholarship focuses on the intersection of family law and immigration law and policy. Before Albany Law School, she completed a Clinical Teaching Fellowship in Immigrant Rights at the University of Baltimore School of Law. She represented immigrants in cases related to torture, domestic violence, human trafficking, and guardianship petitions while working at the Human Rights Initiative of North Texas, Inc., and spent multiple years as a litigation associate in New York and New Jersey. Professor Rogerson earned her J.D. at Seton Hall University, New Jersey, and her LL.M. at Southern Methodist University, Texas.