International War Crime Prosecutor, Kenya’s Chief Justice to Speak

12/27/2011 | Facebook | Twitter | Email
 

Albany Law School’s Africa and International Law conference, held April 12 to 14, 2012, will feature Fatou Bensouda, deputy prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC) at The Hague. Bensouda will replace Moreno O’Campo as the ICC’s chief prosecutor effective June 2012.

Another notable keynote speaker will be Dr. Willy Mutunga, chief justice and president, Supreme Court of Kenya. The three-day conference is part of a year-long Justice Robert H. Jackson '12 Centennial Celebration at Albany Law School.

“The ICC exists today in large part because of the foundation Justice Robert Jackson helped to establish as the chief counsel for the United States in the Nuremberg Trials,” said Professor James Gathii, the associate dean for research and scholarship at Albany Law School and a leading international law scholar with particular expertise on developing countries and international law. 

“The conference will bring together a stellar group of practitioners, scholars and policy-makers to discuss how rules of international law are helping establish and consolidate systems of accountability in Africa and what lessons other countries may learn from this experience,” noted Professor Gathii.

Bensouda will deliver the Annual Justice Jackson Lecture on Thursday, April 12, 2012, at 4.00 p.m. to kick-off the conference. The ICC prosecutes individuals for the crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes when countries are unable and unwilling to do so.

The conference, “Africa and International Law: Taking Stock and Moving Forward,” is open to the public and is one of several in a series of Justice Robert H. Jackson '12 Centennial events. Robert Jackson '12, one of the law school's most esteemed graduates, served as a U.S. Supreme Court Justice from 1941 until his death in 1954. In 1945 he served as the chief prosecutor for the United States in the Nuremberg Trials, which tried the Nazi leaders after World War II.

For more information, visit http://www.africanlaw.org/ or http://www.albanylaw.edu/robertjackson.